Hey guys! I still haven’t gotten started on the Unfinished Song series despite having my free copy of The Initiate waiting for me but it sounds right up my alley being a young adult style high fantasy sprawling series with a female protagonist. Plus I participated in the tour for book five so I had to join in for book six too!

WELCOME TO FAEARTH…where humans are trapped between the immortal fae and the minions of Death. But one woman and the warrior who loves her will defy every taboo to protect their people.

This is the sixth book in The Unfinished Song epic fantasy series. Haven’t read the other books yet? Come taste the world of Faearth… The first book is available right now for FREE

The Unfinished Song (Book 1): Initiate: Amazon
The Unfinished Song (Book 2): Taboo: Amazon
The Unfinished Song (Book 3): Sacrifice: Amazon
The Unfinished Song (Book 4): Root: Amazon
The Unfinished Song (Book 5): Wing: Amazon

Blood (The Unfinished Song #6) by Tara Maya

Dindi and Umbral have an uneasy truce, forced to work together to defeat a greater enemy: the Bone Whistler. The Bone Whistler’s scheme to sacrifice humanity and resurrect the Aelfae will culminate during an eclipse on the spring equinox…in three days.

Their fragile alliance may not withstand the terrors they face. Dindi hides as a clown, but even disguised, her dancing draws the eye of the Bone Whistler himself. She will have to defy him alone, for Umbral has  his own troubles.

Finnadro, who has hunted Umbral for a year, finally catches up with him… determined to punish Umbral for all his black deeds.

Life and death, spring and autumn, human and faery, are all reeling out of balance, and these three days will determine the fate of all Faearth.

AmazonKoboBarnes and NobleSmashwords

Author Bio

Tara Maya has lived in Africa, Europe and Asia. She’s pounded sorghum with mortar and pestle in a little clay village where the jungle meets the desert, meditated in a Buddhist monastery in the Himalayas and sailed the Volga River to a secret city that was once the heart of the Soviet space program. This first-hand experience, as well as research into the strange and piquant histories of lost civilizations, inspires her writing. Her terrible housekeeping, however, is entirely the fault of pixies.

Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Tweet about Blood! Use #TUSBlood.

Fantasy vs. Scifi

The eternal questions: Why do bad things happen to good people? Is there in truth no beauty? And what is the difference between science fiction and fantasy?

David Brin has weighed in on this last question. In his essay, The Difference Between Science Fiction and Fantasy?, he asks, “what is my definition of the separation?”

For all the courage and heroism shown by fantasy characters across 4000 years of great, compelling dramas — NOTHING EVER CHANGES! Aragorn may be a better king than Sauron would have been. Hurray. Fine. But he’s still a freaking king. … The core thing about fantasy tales is that, after the adventure is done and the bad guys are defeated… the social order stays the same.

Obviously, he thinks scifi is cooler, but he’s explained why. To be honest, I think that one reason many people prefer fantasy is because change is static; nostalgia, rather than anticipation, is the guiding motive.

But does it have to be this way? I think Brin conflates two issues. Why is fantasy overwhelmingly feudal? Does fantasy fetishize an unchanging past?

Castles and swords, knights and princesses… I love these things, and I’ve never been able to walk through an old castle without wanting to write a story about it. Legends and myths give me the same feeling. I want to bring these things back to life. I want to imagine myself into that world. One has to leave knowledge of the future behind in that world because people who lived during medieval times did not have a sense of progress. They had a sense of an unchanging world, or in some cases, of a deteriorating world.

It’s also certainly true that fantasy often falls back on feudalism. This is not so strange if one is using a quasi-medieval pseudo-European (or even pseudo-Japanese or pseudo-Chinese or pseudo-Timbuktu) culture. I had an idea once for a story set in a pseudo-Tibetan setting, and what disturbed me most was that most readers wouldn’t have been able to really tell it apart from a pseudo-French one from the same era: Monks, kings, peasants, horses, swords. Yet even in Urban Fantasy, one often finds that the Secret Organization of Were-creatures, Vampires and Merfolk, or whatever it is, operates along quite feudal lines.

One of my secret goals has been to create some democratic fantasy. Now, I don’t always succeed. Faearth (the world of my Unfinished Song series) has no emperors or kings because they are not “advanced” enough. They are not a democracy either. They have elements of both autocratic and democratic governance, in the way that many neolithic cultures did. The system differs from tribe to tribe, and also from year to year, but the basic system is that there are three councils or “societies”: the Society of Matriarchs, the Society of Patriarchs, and the Society of Tavaedies (the warrior-dancers with magic).

These three groups make important decisions together by casting stones (on a mat or into jars), a kind of voting. No one else is allowed to vote, but in theory, everyone in the tribe can vote eventually, if they survive arrows of ordinary misfortune, since the only qualification for becoming a Matriarch or Patriarch is old age or a Shining Name. It’s as if the voting age in our society were 60, except for athletes, veterans and movie stars. (It’s much younger for them because they marry and die younger.)

I did not want to write about a utopia (nor a dystopia) in The Unfinished Song. There are many things I think are admirable in the cultures I describe, but also things which are rather horrid. There is also real change; real progress–though it may be as much a threat as a promise. One thing it is not, is an immutable world. Indeed, that is the crux of the dispute between the fae and the humans. The fae are immutable, immortal and eternal. Their time is circular. The humans, like the Black Arrow of Lady Death, can only travel time in one direction. They must change, as inevitably as they must die.